Rogue Scholar Posts

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Published in chem-bla-ics

In the CDK2024 grant we wrote about updating various software projects using the Chemistry Development Kit. We even wrote that “[r]equired API changes will be publicly shared and disseminated with the Groovy Cheminformatics with the Chemistry Development Kit book (egonw.github.io/cdkbook/)”. The Groovy Cheminformatics with the Chemistry Development Kit book is a project that has run since 2009.

Published in Henry Rzepa's Blog

I should start by saying that the server on which this blog is posted was set up in June 1993. Although the physical object has been replaced a few times, and had been “virtualised” about 15 years ago, a small number of the underlying software base components may well date way back, perhaps even to 1993.

Published in Henry Rzepa's Blog

Chemists now use the term “curly arrows” as a language to describe the electronic rearrangements that occur when a (predominately organic) molecule transforms to another – the so called chemical reaction. It is also used to infer, via valence bond or resonance theory, what the mechanistic implications of that reaction are.

Published in chem-bla-ics

Ammar is finishing up his PhD thesis with his research on the use of FAIR towards predictive toxicology. Or, “AI ready”, as the term FAIR is now sometimes explained. Any computational method needs good data, and just FAIR is not enough. It needs to meet community standards, as formalized in R1.3. To me, this includes meeting community standards like minimal reporting standards.

Published in chem-bla-ics

Noting that in the coming week I am not attending the ELIXIR All Hands in Uppsala. Having lived in (and around) Uppsala for more than three years, I am disappointed and with the first stories from colleagues coming in even more. But it has been a way too busy year, I have much to finish up, and I need to take care of myself too. I am not 32 anymore. But in the past two weeks I did attend two workshops.

Published in chem-bla-ics

I was about to call this blog post From spreadsheets to RDF , after the post last week. But then I decided to just use the pattern I typically use. Why I wanted to use that shorter term in the first place was that one of the thing I like about the AMBIT software (of OpenTox and eNanoMapper fame) is its RDF support (see doi:10.1186/1756-0500-4-487). But RDF, ontologies, those are hard things.

Published in Henry Rzepa's Blog

In the previous post, I explored the so-called “impossible” molecule methanetriol. It is regarded as such because the equilbrium resulting in loss of water is very facile, being exoenergic by ~14 kcal/mol in free energy. Here I explore whether changing the substituent R could result in suppressing the loss of water and stabilising the triol.