Rogue Scholar Posts

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Published in chem-bla-ics

We recently got awarded our second NWO Open Science grant (OSF23.2.097), this time for the Chemistry Development Kit (CDK). “We” here is me and Alyanne de Haan, René van der Ploeg, and Marc Teunis from Hogeschool Utrecht. The proposal has been submitted for public dissemination in RIO Journal, like we did with the first NWO Open Science grant.

Published in chem-bla-ics

During the Open Science Retreat I organized a short session where we looking into typing citation intentions using a new nanopublication template. First, let’s describe nanopublications (originally used in doi:10.3233/ISU-2010-0613) a bit. Scholia gives a nice overview of (macro?)publications on the topic.

Published in chem-bla-ics

Last week I attended the Open Science Retreat (#osr24nl) in a quite and relaxing region in North-Holland. The meeting was how I like all meetings to be (and I count myself lucky many of my meetings are like this): open, welcoming, constructive, diverse, and intellectually challenging. Not all scientific meetings are like this and it is easy to end up going to obligatory meetings where the discussions are of a different level.

Published in Henry Rzepa's Blog

In the mid to late 1990s as the Web developed, it was becoming more obvious that one area it would revolutionise was of scholarly journal publishing. Since the days of the very first scientific journals in the 1650s, the medium had been firmly rooted in paper. Even printed colour only became common (and affordable) from the 1980s. An opportunity to move away from these restrictions was provided by the Web.

Published in Henry Rzepa's Blog

I have written a few times about the so-called “anomeric effect”, which relates to stereoelectronic interactions in molecules such as sugars bearing a tetrahedral carbon atom with at least two oxygen substituents. The effect can be detected when the two C-O bond lengths in such molecules are inspected, most obviously when one of these bonds has a very different length from the other.

Published in chem-bla-ics

My research is about the interaction of (machine) representation and the impact on the success of data analysis (matchine learning, chemometrics, AI, etc). See the posts about molecular chemometrics. This got me into FAIR: making data interoperable and being able to (really) reuse data is the starting point of doing research.

Published in Henry Rzepa's Blog

The recent release of the DataCite Data Citation corpus, which has the stated aim of providing “a trusted central aggregate of all data citations to further our understanding of data usage and advance meaningful data metrics” made me want to investigate what the current state of citing data in the area of chemistry might be. Chemistry is known to be a “data rich” science (as most of the physical sciences are) and  here on this very blog I

Published in Henry Rzepa's Blog

Following on from my template exploration of the Wilkinson hydrogenation catalyst, I now repeat this for the Grubbs variant of the Alkene metathesis reaction. As with the Wilkinson, here I focus on the stereochemistry of the mechanism as first suggested by Chauvin[1], an aspect lacking in eg the Wikipedia entry.

Published in chem-bla-ics

Just before the end of the year, the Wikidata subsetting: approaches, tools, and evaluation paper by Seyed Amir Hosseini Beghaeiraveri et al. got published (doi:10.3233/SW-233491). I am really excited our group (i.e. Ammar and Denise) has been able to contribute to this. I think it also is a great example of the power of hackathons to bring together people.