Rogue Scholar Posts

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Published in Henry Rzepa's Blog

In the previous post, I explored the so-called “impossible” molecule methanetriol. It is regarded as such because the equilbrium resulting in loss of water is very facile, being exoenergic by ~14 kcal/mol in free energy. Here I explore whether changing the substituent R could result in suppressing the loss of water and stabilising the triol.

Published in chem-bla-ics

Making something FAIR is hard, particularly when you do more than making something findable. We’ve seen before that making something usefully findable requires deep indexing, and already that continues to be difficult, because we are not seeing it enough. So, when I thought convert a paper led by Hoet’s lab in Leuven into machine-actionable RDF to make it FAIR, I gravely underestimated the amount of work.

Published in chem-bla-ics

Publishing grant proposal is still not very common. The proposal published in Research Ideas and Outcomes) (doi:10.3897/rio.10.e124884) for the NWO Open Science grant for the CDK is, however, not the first and hopefully not the last. Interestingly, it is already cited in (the German) Wikipedia. It is used there to support a statement which tools use the Chemistry Development Kit.

Published in Henry Rzepa's Blog

What constitutes an “impossible molecule”? Well, here are two, the first being the topic of a recent article[1]. The second is a favourite of organic chemistry tutors, to see if their students recognise it as an unusual (= impossible) form of a much better known molecule. Perhaps we could define impossible molecules into two slightly different classes.

Published in Henry Rzepa's Blog

In an earlier post, I discussed[1] a phenomenon known as the “anomeric effect” exhibited by tetrahedral carbon compounds with four C-O bonds. Each oxygen itself bears two bonds and has two lone pairs, and either of these can align with one of three other C-O bonds to generate an anomeric effect. Here I change the central carbon to a boron to explore what happens, as indeed I promised earlier.

Published in chem-bla-ics

We recently got awarded our second NWO Open Science grant (OSF23.2.097), this time for the Chemistry Development Kit (CDK). “We” here is me and Alyanne de Haan, René van der Ploeg, and Marc Teunis from Hogeschool Utrecht. The proposal has been submitted for public dissemination in RIO Journal, like we did with the first NWO Open Science grant.

Published in chem-bla-ics

During the Open Science Retreat I organized a short session where we looking into typing citation intentions using a new nanopublication template. First, let’s describe nanopublications (originally used in doi:10.3233/ISU-2010-0613) a bit. Scholia gives a nice overview of (macro?)publications on the topic.

Published in chem-bla-ics

Last week I attended the Open Science Retreat (#osr24nl) in a quite and relaxing region in North-Holland. The meeting was how I like all meetings to be (and I count myself lucky many of my meetings are like this): open, welcoming, constructive, diverse, and intellectually challenging. Not all scientific meetings are like this and it is easy to end up going to obligatory meetings where the discussions are of a different level.