Rogue Scholar Posts

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Published in GigaBlog

A guest post from our summer data science intern Raniere Silva. Raniere is a PhD Candidate at City University of Hong Kong and interested in reproducible research. Raniere Silva During July and August 2022, I was a summer intern at GigaScience Press investigating how GigaScience and GigaByte journals could use Frictionless Data to help researchers make data driven discovery faster.

Published in iPhylo

This is a guest post by Tony Rees. It would be difficult to encounter a scientist, or anyone interested in science, who is not familiar with the microscope, a tool for making objects visible that are otherwise too small to be properly seen by the unaided eye, or to reveal otherwise invisible fine detail in larger objects.

Published in iPhylo

The following is a guest post by Bob Mesibov. No winner yet in the second Darwin Core Million for 2020, but there are another two and a half weeks to go (to 30 September). For details of the contest see this iPhylo blog post. And please don’t submit a million RECORDS, just (roughly) a million DATA ITEMS. That’s about 20,000 records with 50 fields in the table, or about 50,000 records with 20 fields, or something arithmetically similar.

Published in GigaBlog

With ongoing the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic providing us with unprecedented insight into the progression of a disease outbreak, and unprecedented time in the lock down to turn us all into armchair epidemiologists. This includes near real-time sharing and analysis of genomics data through platforms like nextstrain, and of ways to view the infection, mortality and testing statistics via a growing number of online dashboards.

Published in GigaBlog

It’s DNA day, commemorating the publication of the structure of DNA in 1953, as well as the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003. Genomics has come a long way since then. Today it is possible to sequence whole genomes with a very reasonable investment of time and money. What an amazing time for scientists who are working with non-model organisms.

Published in GigaBlog

With the current annual data creation rate estimated to be in the tens of zettabytes, the flood of information currently being generated in every area of human life is crashing up against limited data storage solutions. However, DNA, which serves as a storage system for biological information, has been proposed as a potential means to store an unlimited amount of information.