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Leiden Madtrics
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Published
Authors Alysson Mazoni, Rodrigo Costas

A broad landscape of open research information systems The landscape of open research information systems is broad. In addition to large (and global) open data sources like OpenAlex, OpenAIRE, or PubMed, we also have local or regional open data sources like SciELO, Redalyc or LaReferencia.

Published

The origin of the phrase "publish or perish" was first questioned by Eugene Garfield (1996). He wrote that he had used the phrase in his speeches for thirty years, but had not heard anything about its origin. He consulted professors, librarians, dictionaries, and the Internet, but never found out who first suggested the phrase.

Published
Authors Dominique Babini, Arianna Becerril Garcia, Rodrigo Costas, Lautaro Matas, Ismael Rafols, Laura Rovelli

The Barcelona Declaration: a call for openness… but also for diversity and inclusion The launch of the Barcelona Declaration last week aims to mobilise the global research community towards making research information open and accessible.

Published

What reforms in how we assess and value research are necessary to better equip public science systems for the existential challenges of the 21st century? How can we understand and tackle issues such as inequitable access to scientific literature, increasing strain on peer review systems, and publisher oligopolies?

Published
Authors Julián D. Cortés, Catalina Ramírez

Imagine national science policy as a musical chair game. The contestants are the science system actors, such as researchers, research groups, universities, companies, among others. Some actors can have more expertise dancing at the rhythm of salsa than hip-hop, while others might be more agile in finding a seat when the music pauses. The government plays or pauses the music, modulates its speed or changes the genre.

Published
Authors Tsuyoshi Hondou, Ismael Rafols

Studies on transdisciplinary research often focus on how different forms of expertise are brought together to build robust knowledge. However, in policy and legal affairs, there are many situations in which it is not possible to use new transdisciplinary knowledge due to contextual factors, such as urgency, political expediency, or lack of resources.