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Aaron Tay's Musings about librarianship

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Author Aaron Tay

As academic search engines and databases incorporate the use of generative AI into their systems, an important concept that all librarian should grasp is that of retrieval augmented generation (RAG).   You see it in use in all sorts of "AI products" today from chatbots like Bing Copilot, to Adobe's Acrobat Ai assistant that allow you to chat with your PDF.

Published
Author Aaron Tay

In the last blog post , I argued that despite the advancements in AI thanks to transformer based large language models, most academic search still are focused mostly in supporting exploratory searches and do not focus on optimizing recall and in fact trade off low latency for accuracy.

Published
Author Aaron Tay

One of the tricks about using the newer "AI powered" search systems like Elicit, SciSpace and even JSTOR experiment search is that they recommend that you type in your query or what you want in full natural language and not keyword search style (where you drop the stop words) for better results. So for example do

Published
Author Aaron Tay

Earlier related pieces - How Q&A systems based on large language models (eg GPT4) will change things if they become the dominant search paradigm - 9 implications for libraries In the ever-evolving landscape of information retrieval and library science, the emergence of large language models, particularly those based on the transformer architecture like GPT-4, has opened up a Pandora's box of possibilities and challenges.

Published
Author Aaron Tay

Note: This is a lightly edited piece of something I wrote for my institution What is Google’s Search Generative Experience (SGE)? In past ResearchRadar pieces, we have discussed about how search engines both general (e.g. Bing Chat, Perplexity) and academic (e.g Elicit, Scite Assistant, Scopus (upcoming)) are integrating search with generative AI (via Large Language Models) using techniques like RAG (Retrieval Augmented Generation). But what